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The Reflector

The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

    Bash headliners appeal to broader college crowd

    Bulldog Bash isn’t just having a change in headliners. It’s having two. Up-and-coming artist Howie Day and neo-soul musician Calvin Richardson will headline this year’s Bash.
    Both musicians were among the Student Associations’ top choices to headline this year’s concert series.
    Day, a 23-year-old Maine native, is best known for his songs “Collide” and “Perfect Time of Day,” while exploring themes of love, loss and regret with his music.
    “He appeals to our age. I think we’ll see a lot more of him in the future because he’s such a young artist,” said Cliff Jones, co-director of external affairs for the Student Association.
    Fans anticipate Day’s sophomore release “Stop All The World Now,” which features songs like “Numbness for Sound” and “She Says.”
    “He’s a real up-and-coming guy. He’s like a John Mayer,” SA President Adam Telle said.. Telle compared Day’s music to that of John Mayer.
    “People who have heard of him really like him and people who haven’t heard of him should,” Chrissie Prichard, SA co-director of external affiars, said. “Anybody who knows anything about music should have heard about Howie Day. Same thing for Calvin Richardson.”
    Similarly, Richardson’s neo-soul sound places him at the forefront of emerging artists.
    “It’s almost a back lash at R&B of the last 20 years. He’s going back to the roots of soul,” Telle said.
    Richardson’s neo-soul music is gaining popularity with his first Hollywood Records release “Keep on Pushin,” Other songs featured on his new album titled “2:35 p.m.” for the birth of his son Souljah, include “Put My Money on You” and “More Than a Woman,” which earned him a Grammy nomination for songwriting.
    “I think that he plays honest and sincere music. He’s the new Marvin Gaye,” Jones said.
    Richardson’s first record “Country Boy” reflected his childhood growing up as the fifth of nine children in North Carolina. Richardson was raised on gospel music and in later years experienced the sounds of R&B which have influence his music.

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    Bash headliners appeal to broader college crowd