The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

Local Creations

 
 

 
 
When the online store Etsy opened in June of 2005, the world did not know what an influence it would be on designers. The website serves as an online craft festival limited to vintage and handmade items. Starkville is the perfect example of Etsy’s inspiration with its designers.
 
Molly Gee Waggener,
Molly Gee Designs
The variety of Molly Gee’s headbands and hair clips can be easily recognized. Her merchandise is not only sold at Libby Story but also at a wide range of stores from Gainesville, Fla. to Boston, Mass. During her freshman year at MSU, Molly Gee started designing her own clothing as an apparel, textiles and merchandising major. She was taught to sew by her grandmother in the fourth grade, but she later picked the hobby back up in a sewing class. However, she switched gears from clothing to headbands.
“I never thought I would change the main focal point of my line, but I must say that I am proud of the outcome,” said Waggener. She began focusing on her own business in 2008 and she later moved back to Jackson from New York. Visit mollygeedesigns.comfor more information on the line.
 

Claire Elliott and Sarah Hollinger, Harvester’s Crafts
Last year, Claire Elliott, sophomore and communication major, and Sarah Hollinger, junior and Spanish major, spent their free time buying supplies at the now defunct Golden Triangle Fabric Store for various crafts.
“We would come out of that store with so many bags, we would wonder where are we going to put our items,” said Elliott.
They decided to start their craft business, Harvester’s Crafts, just for fun. The girls both contribute different abilities to the business. Elliott is great at sewing by hand and working with burlap. Hollinger’s abilities are using her sewing machine and crocheting, a hobby she has had since she was a young girl. The girls have a website, harvesterscrafts.com, but mainly the business has spread mainly through word of mouth. Harvester’s Crafts offers a wide array of products such as scarves, dishrags, headbands, frames and crocheted items. The profits mainly go to future mission projects and various charities.
 
Emily Allen, The Vintage Tree
After she bought a headband at Forever 21, Emily came up with the idea of trying to make her own headbands to match clothes.
“I have always been a crafty person. Plus, I am a major in apparel, textiles, and merchandising, so I thought starting my own business would be great,” said Allen.
Later, she posted 12 headbands for sale, and they sold within a day. The girls at Hurst Hall, where Allen is a RA, have become fans of The Vintage Tree. Allen uses scrap fabrics left over from making clothing for her classes. Flowers and teardrops are usually the focal point of her headbands. When she goes home she visits Repeat Street where she gets vintage jewelry to add to her headbands. Oftentimes, Allen will make customized headbands upon request. Allen can be contacted at [email protected].
 
Arielle St. Pé,
Ocean Gypsy Gems (O.G.G.)
Ocean Gypsy Gems is a jewelry line that features wire-wrapped jewelry with a variety of stones.
“Wire is one of my favorite things to work with because you simply make something out of nothing,” St. Pe said. Earlier this month, St. Pé had a jewelry show with Runway Fashions. Over the summer, St. Pé spent her time helping out at a family friend’s business, The Beaded Path, in South Orange, N.J. St. Pé uses all of her materials exclusively from The Beaded Path. During her time here at MSU, St. Pé interned at Ralph Lauren where she would have to count and take pictures of the products that came into the show room. She also came up with the name for one of Ralph Lauren’s latest collections, The Americana.
“My internship has helped me learn how to manage my business and my photography for my collection,” St. Pé said. St. Pé can be contacted at [email protected].
 
Meredith Pittman,
Fringe Designs
After accepting her job as the Mississippi State Welcome Center Coordinator last summer, Meredith Pittman began looking at headbands. She personally wanted to create hair clips and headbands that matched her outfits and her own style.
“Fringe is defined as adding an accessory to an outfit. So, the name, Fringe Designs, fits since the items are accessories,” Pittman said.
Since then, her hair accessories have been sold at stores such as Runway Fashions in Starkville and Andie Grace in her hometown of Corinth. Many of the pieces for Fringe Designs are influenced by Pittman’s family, especially her father; after he passed away, she made a collection called “Indian Sunset,” in honor of her father’s interestin Native American culture centered around Colorado. Pittman’s father was interested in Indians, and they would go on vacation in Colorado. Meredith can be contacted at [email protected], and items can be purchased online at fringedesignsmp.moonfruit.com.

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Local Creations