The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University

The Reflector

Students cause fuss among BITNET system

A computer bug has bitten Mississippi State University.

Due to security reasons, the Because It’s Time Network, a world-wide computing network to which MSU belongs, has temporarily been made unavailable to the 150 students who are allowed to use the computer.

 

According to Mike Rackley, Manager of System and Network Programming at the Computer Center in Allen Hall, several of the 150 students who are allowed to use BITNET have gotten access to administrative information, which they are not supposed to have, through the computer. Rackley said that for this reason the computers have temporarily been made unavailable to the students.

 

BITNET is a world-wide computing network in which over 600 universities across the nation are a member of. This system is used for such activities as exchanging electronic mail and even participating in group discussions with a university miles away.

 

The computer system is used by faculty and staff and is also available to about 150 students who have their dean’s signature on a letter stating that this particular student has a legitimate need to use the BITNET for academic reasons only.

 

The Computing Center will reopen BITNET for student use in the near future with the installment of a new computing system that is currently on order.

 

“We hope to get the new system in, installed and reopen BITNET to students as soon as possible,” Rackley said. However, he also said that it could be up to four months before BITNET is made available to students again.

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The Student Newspaper of Mississippi State University
Students cause fuss among BITNET system